Tourists at a popular Lanzarote beach banned from entering the water after hundreds of poisonous jellyfish wash up on sand

Tourists at a popular Lanzarote beach banned from entering the water after hundreds of poisonous jellyfish wash up on sand

TOURISTS at a popular beach in Lanzarote have been banned from entering the water after hundreds poisonous jellyfish washed up on the sand. The ven

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TOURISTS at a popular beach in Lanzarote have been banned from entering the water after hundreds poisonous jellyfish washed up on the sand.

The venomous creatures first began to appear at Famara beach on the north-western coast on Monday – by Wednesday hundreds were covering the shores.

Central European News

Hundreds of mysterious jellyfish have washed up on popular Famara beach in Lanzarote[/caption]

The species of the jellyfish is not yet confirmed, but they are said to be venomous, with the animal’s tentacles causing stings.

Enrique Espinosa, from the local Safety and Emergencies Consortium, said a red flag is flying at the beach to warn people not to enter the water.

He added that the scenes on the beach were a “total atrocity”.

Local authorities are recommending that victims see a lifeguard quickly if they are stung, in order to have the tentacles removed and receive prescription painkillers to reduce the swelling.

Local media reports say that the jellyfish appear to be common water dwellers that surround the area.


It is believed the jellyfish were brought to the beach by currents and reports state they are relatively common in small numbers in the area during the summer season.

Around 500,000 tourists from the UK visited Lanzarote between January and April this year – with many more expected to hit the shores this summer.

Last month, hundreds of deadly Portugese Man O’ War jellyfish washed up on the shores of popular Spanish beaches like the Costa del Sol, wreaking havoc for Brit swimmers.

Naomi Mateos, 22 was swimming just 10 metres from the beach when one of the jellyfish’s tentacles wrapped around her arms, back and breasts.

She was left with horrific scars from the attack and in unimaginable pain.

Central European News

Visitors have been advised not to swim until the venomous creatures have washed off the beach[/caption]

The species of jellyfish remains unknown but locals believe they are common water dwellers
Central European News

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